all about

The story behind the bits

My name is Romain Moisescot and I am the webmaster of all about Steve Jobs.com. By webmaster I mean the owner, designer, developer and editor of the website, which is a one-man operation. I started it on February 24, 2006, Steve Jobs's 51st birthday... and my 19th.

The website was named all about Steve back then, but its objective was the same as today's: to bring you (and me) the most complete online resource about Steve Jobs. Although I had been an avid Mac user since my early teens, I had become a huge fan of the man after reading his biography by Alan Deutschman, The Second Coming of Steve Jobs, in 2004. After trying to gather more information about him, I was desperate to see that no good website was dedicated to him: so I decided to build one.

all about Steve Jobs.com has improved a lot over the years, as I kept adding more content to it. However, the main sections were there at the beginning: a Biography, a Personality page (Persona today, Being Steve back then), and a large media collection consisting of pictures of Steve, his life's work and places, as well as video montages. The most successful video of the website and its first place in the spotlight was actually released on its first version: Boom! was viewed over 750,000 times as of early 2012, and launched a whole new class of video parodies of Apple: the keynote collage. That did not stop me from improving the site: a blog was added in 2010, and a Sayings and Keynotes page in 2012.

Media coverage

I am contacted from time to time by prominent media to comment on Steve Jobs news or to provide information about some of their sources. This included the CBS's 60 Minutes, CNBC Titans, Bloomberg TV, The Discovery Channel, NBC Bay Area, Vanity Fair, Liberation, AskMen.com, and 1Live. Of course, the website is also often featured in the Apple/tech blogosphere and sometimes in the press, as the ultimate Steve Jobs fandom refuge. My favorite characterization of it actually came from the San Jose Mercury News, where Mike Cassidy called it 'a digital shrine to a tech god' and 'a labor of love'.

Check out the 'press review' highlights below (sorted in inverse chronological order):

  • Oct 8 2011: French Canadian website Technaute profiled me and the website after Steve's passing
  • Oct 6 2011: I was interviewed by CNet to comment on Steve's passing (extract here)
  • Mar 20 2011: I had the great luck to be profiled in Steve Jobs's neighborhood newspaper, the San Jose Mercury News, in Mike Cassidy's Sunday column (the article has been pulled - here it is)
  • Mar 11 2011: ZDNet used the biography as a source for their own long article on Jobs's succession
  • Mar 2 2011: Alexia Tsotsis of TechCrunch featured the 'One More Thing' video in a post
  • Jan 3 2011: Mashable used a couple videos of the site for a collection on keynote mashups
  • Nov 30 2010: The Unofficial Apple Weblog (TUAW) quoted the website's video on the Mac OS X/NeXTSTEP heritage
  • Nov 18 2010: a German videocast profiled the website in their weekly show
  • Nov 16 2010: Philip Elmer-Dewitt of Fortune dug up a photo of Steve on his Apple 2.0 blog which started a huge buzz, including on LifeHacker, Cult of Mac, and MacLife
  • Mar 27 2010: The Guardian's blog quoted the site
  • Feb 26 2010: Gizmodo joked about an old photo of Steve at NeXT... and beachballs
  • Aug 24 2008: Cult of Mac started a buzz about our exclusive Apple internal video from 1997
  • Aug 8 2008: The Unofficial Apple Weblog (TUAW) featured the 'All Time Favorites' video
  • Feb 8 2007: Engadget featured the 'All Time Favorites' video
  • Oct 2006: criticism is great when it's that fun --Dan Lyons wrote about the site on his famous Fake Steve Jobs blog
  • Oct 13 2006: The Unofficial Apple Weblog (TUAW) wrote "Romain Moisescot loves Steve Jobs in a big way"
  • Sep 28 2006: the great John Gruber wrote about the Boom! video on Daring Fireball
  • Apr 25 2006: Gawker wrote about the caricatures page
  • Soon after the launch, Steve Wozniak's Woz.org featured a prominent link to the site which lasted for three years
  • Feb 27 2006: French Mac news site Mac4Ever wrote about the launch of the website