Key People
  • Henry Ford 1863-1947

    Henry Ford was an American industrialist, who is often credited for democratizing the car in the early 20th century. Steve Jobs often spoke of him as a personal hero of his. He was known for his peculiar views on management and taste: Steve often made Ford's famous quote "they can have it any color they want as long as it's black" his.

    Tagged in: Idols

  • Thomas Edison 1884-1931

    In the early days of Apple, Steve would often talk about Thomas Edison, and how this great American inventor/entrepreneur changed the world with his brilliant devices. Edison is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory, in Menlo Park, NJ. After his death, Jobs was often compared to Edison for creating a great American corporation and using it to change the world, though the comparison with Walt Disney is perhaps more relevant.

    Tagged in: Idols

  • Ansel Adams 1902-1984

    Ansel Adams was an American photographer known for his black-and-white photographs of the American West, and primarily Yosemite National Park. Steve Jobs, like many Californians, had a fondness for Yosemite, where he actually got married; and he also loved black and white photography, hence his interest in Ansel Adams. For a while, prints of Adams photographs were the only decoration in his home, and he also used them at the NeXT offices.

    Tagged in: Idols

  • Edwin Land 1909-1991

    Edwin Land was an American inventor and entrepreneur, the father of the polaroid photograph, and co-founder of the Polaroid corporation. Steve heard about him and he quickly became a role model for him in the early 1980s. He eventually met with Land and that visit made a great impression on him — especially Land's talk of being at "the intersection of art and science". The similarities are troubling, as Land dropped out of Harvard to start Polaroid, from which he was fired later on, just like Steve with Apple.

    Tagged in: Idols

  • Akio Morita 1921-1999

    Akio Morita co-founded Sony Corporation with Masaru Ibuka. He is widely acknowledged as the father of the consumer electronics industry, having brought to market the transistor, color TV, Walkman... Steve Jobs was an immense admirer of Sony and always talked of making Apple "the Sony of computers". Ironically, Apple eventually became much better than Sony not only at computers but also at its core business of consumer electronics. When Morita died in 1999, Steve paid tribute to him at the beginning of an Apple product announcement.

    Tagged in: Idols

  • Paul Jobs 1922-1993

    Paul Jobs was born and raised in Wisconsin, and served in the Coast Guard during World War II. After the war, he settled in San Francisco and married with Clara Hagopian in 1946. The couple adopted baby Steve nine years later. Paul, who never graduated from high school even, became a car machinist — he fixed broken cars and sold them for a profit. He taught his son Steve the importance of craftsmanship, and how to get parts for a low price from dealers. That would prove useful in Apple's early years. Steve had the greatest respect for his father.

    Tagged in: Close ones

  • Andy Grove Born in 1936

    Andy Grove helped Gordon Moore and Bob Noyce start Intel in 1967, becoming the company's third employee. He eventually became CEO of Intel in 1987, and remained so until 1998. Steve Jobs met with Grove during his early tenure at Apple in the late 1970s, and held him as a business mentor and a friend. Steve came to him for advice, including in his last years, when he was struggling against cancer — as Grove himself had survived prostate cancer several years earlier.

    Tagged in: Mentors

  • Kobun Chino Otogowa 1938-2002

    Kobun Chino Otogowa was Steve's zen guru from the Los Altos Zen Center, back in the 1970s. He is credited for telling Steve to start Apple rather than becoming a Zen monk. When Steve Jobs started NeXT in 1986, he was prompt to name Kobun 'spiritual advisor' to the company; and five years later, although he was not the best at speaking English, Chino conducted Steve's wedding ceremony with Laurene Powell. Kobun Chino died trying to save his daughter from drowning in 2002.

    Tagged in: Mentors

  • John Sculley Born in 1939

    Steve Jobs hired PepsiCo CEO John Sculley with the famous phrase: "do you want to sell sugared water for the rest of your life, or do you want to come with me and change the world?" Sculley became Apple's CEO in 1983, and started a business honeymoon with Steve that lasted about two years. However, because of increasing tension in the company due to disappointing Macintosh sales, Sculley and Jobs eventually had a fall-out, that lead to Steve's resignation in September 1985. Steve never forgave Sculley for betraying him, and called him 'corrupt' publicly on several occasions.

    Tagged in: Mentors, Apple 80s

  • Regis McKenna Born in 1939

    Regis McKenna was the marketing guru of Silicon Valley in the 1970s and 1980s. Steve heard he managed the Intel account, and tried desperately to have him 'manage' the two-people operation that was Apple back in 1977. McKenna eventually accepted and was even instrumental in bringing investor Mike Markkula in. Steve was always nice to McKenna, from whom he often sought advice. One if his favorite quotes was "the best kind of marketing is education." Rumor has it that the jobs title on McKenna's business card was "himself".

    Tagged in: Mentors, Apple 80s

  • John Warnock Born in 1940

    John Warnock is a Xerox PARC alumnus, the brilliant inventor of the Postscript language and co-founder of Adobe Systems Inc. This soft-spoken, academic type was a tremendous source of inspiration to Steve in his approach to graphics on computers. Steve held Warnock as a mentor and played an instrumental role in the founding of Adobe, via a massive early investment by Apple. They remained in good terms, even though Apple and Adobe increasingly antagonized one another because of the issue of Flash on iOS devices.

    Tagged in: Mentors

  • Alan Kay Born in 1940

    Alan Kay was a researcher at Xerox PARC when Steve met him in the late 1970s. He is considered one of the fathers of the graphical user interface and object-oriented programming (i.e. he is exceptionally brilliant). He was both a friend and a mentor to Steve, and certainly made a big impression on his views on technology, as Apple popularized GUIs and NeXT, object-oriented software. Kay also introduced Jobs to George Lucas, who wanted to get rid of a small team of computer animation scientists — who eventually became the Pixar founders.

    Tagged in: Mentors, Apple 80s

  • Bob Dylan Born in 1941

    Steve Jobs was a huge fan of folk singer Bob Dylan all his life. In his youth, he would play his songs all day, collect as many of his bootlegs as he could, and one of his favorite pastimes was actually to rewrite the lyrics of his songs. In the early 1980s, Steve even dated Joan Baez — mostly because she was Dylan's ex-girlfriend. When Apple eventually became a music powerhouse, Steve was thrilled that Dylan accepted to make an iPod commercial for his company.

    Tagged in: Idols

  • Bill Campbell Born in 1941

    Bill Campbell, often known as 'the coach' because of his college football career, joined Apple in 1983 to become VP of Marketing. He sided with Apple's board and pushed for Steve Jobs's departure in 1985, but left the company in 1987 to start Claris, then Intuit. However, he re-bounded with Steve later on, and was asked to join the Apple board in 1997. He was also a big adviser to the Google founders, but left their board in 2010 because of their competition with Apple. Campbell spoke at Apple's memorial ceremony honoring Steve Jobs

    Tagged in: Apple 80s, Apple 2.0

  • Mike Markkula Born in 1942

    A millionaire retiree from Intel, Mike Markkula was an angel investor in Apple, actually the first investor in the company, who put $250k on the table in 1977. Markkula believed in Steve Jobs's and Woz's idea of a personal computer even before they did — he claimed Apple would be a Fortune 500 company in two years. After a 2-year interim as CEO, Mike stayed on Apple's board, and approved of Steve's departure in 1985. He left when Steve asked him to resign along with the rest of the board in 1997.

    Tagged in: Mentors, Apple 80s

  • Michael Eisner Born in 1942

    Eisner was CEO of The Walt Disney Company from 1984 to 2005. He saved the company from a certain decline in the mid-1980s. In the making of Toy Story, he was originally supportive (though most of the deal was worked out by Jeffrey Katzenberg). However, when time came to renegotiate Pixar's contracts, he became increasingly opposed to Jobs. He publicly stood out against Apple invoking their "Rip. Mix. Burn" ad campaign in 2002, and didn't renew the Disney-Pixar deal in 2004. This was a key argument in his ousting in 2005, when he was replaced by Bob Iger.

    Tagged in: Pixar

  • Nolan Bushnell Born in 1943

    Nolan Bushnell is the founder of Atari and Steve's first employer (apart from his internship at HP at age 13). He is widely regarded as the father of the video game industry. According to Woz, he was an inspiration to Steve Jobs to start Apple — the man eventually co-founded over 15 companies. When Steve left Apple in 1985, he was one of the few businessmen who voiced their concern. He said to Time magazine "Where is Apple's inspiration going to come from? Is Apple going to have all the romance of a new brand of Pepsi?"

    Tagged in: Mentors

  • Alvy Ray Smith Born in 1943

    A computer scientist and a child of the 1960s, Alvy was one of the visionaries who started Pixar, together with Dr. Ed Catmull, back in the days at Lucasfilm. They both shared the idea of making a computer-animated feature film one day, knowing the technology was not there yet. However, Alvy did not stay at Pixar long enough to be part of its incredible success: he left in the early 1990s after a pretty violent falling-out with Steve Jobs. He was eventually cleared of the company's official history.

    Tagged in: Pixar

  • Gil Amelio Born in 1943

    Gil Amelio was Apple's CEO for exactly 500 days, in 1996-97. He understood Apple's problems and tried to fix them by cutting back expenses and forming business partnerships. One of the issues he addressed was Apple's failure to deliver a modern OS: he eventually bought NeXT for their NeXTSTEP OS — bringing back Steve Jobs to the company he founded. Steve eventually made Amelio leave after a board coup in February 1997, and became interim CEO of Apple.

    Tagged in: Apple 2.0

  • Mike Scott Born in 1943

    Mike Scott was a former National Semiconductor employee, a friend of Mike Markkula who convinced him to become Apple's first CEO in 1977. 'Scotty' was instrumental in the company's exponential growth of its first years, bringing with him valuable management experience. However, he was strong-headed and would often have arguments with Steve Jobs. He eventually was asked to leave the company after he unilaterally decided to fire several employees on 'Black Wednesday' in 1981.

    Tagged in: Apple 80s

  • Lee Clow Born in 1943

    A self-made advertising art director, Lee Clow was already 40 years old when he met young Steve Jobs for the marketing of Macintosh. He was the mastermind behind the famous '1984' Super Bowl commercial, which is often regarded as the best TV ad of the 20th century. When Steve came back at Apple in 1997, he hired Chiat\Day again for the trademark 'Think Different' campaign, with which Apple was associated for the following decade. Clow is still chairman and global director of MAL in 2009, and remained a good friend of Steve until his death.

    Tagged in: Apple 80s, Apple 2.0

  • Jef Raskin 1943-2005

    Jef Raskin was an academically-trained computer scientist who joined Apple in 1978. The work at Xerox PARC inspired him to start the Macintosh project (named after his favorite apple), that of an "information appliance" that would be "as easy to use as a toaster" and very inexpensive. Steve Jobs heard about it and took over the project after he was kicked out of the Lisa team. Raskin left Apple soon afterwards, out of disagreements with Steve.

    Tagged in: Apple 80s

  • Jean-Louis Gassée Born in 1944

    A French engineer turned business executive, Jean-Louis Gassée joined Apple in 1981 to start its French division. Apple France was a great success, and Gassée became increasingly influential at Apple. He took over the Macintosh project after Steve Jobs left in 1985. Gassée remained at Apple until 1990, and started a software company soon afterwards, Be Inc. When Apple had to acquire an OS in 1996, they first picked BeOS, before switching to Steve Jobs's NeXTSTEP.

    Tagged in: Apple 80s

  • Larry Ellison Born in 1944

    Larry Ellison is the world's fifth richest man, the co-founder of business software company Oracle which he started in his garage. He is very famous among the Valley's gossip columnist for his exuberant lifestyle. One of Steve Jobs's best friends, he was instrumental in bringing him back at Apple in 1997, publicly claiming he intended to buy the company (he is worth $33 billion in 2011).

    Tagged in: Apple 2.0

  • Edwin Catmull Born in 1945

    A soft-spoken Mormon, Dr. Ed Catmull is a brilliant computer scientist who is often credited for his pioneer work in computer animation. He had a vision of making a computer-animated feature film as early as the 1970s, and that's why he started Lucasfilm's digital division with Alvy Ray Smith. In 1986, that division was sold to Steve Jobs and became Pixar, and the rest is history. After the Pixar-Disney merger, Catmull became president of Walt Disney Animation Studios.

    Tagged in: Pixar

  • Al Gore Born in 1948

    Al Gore was US Vice President from 1993 to 2000, during Bill Clinton's tenure. During his mandate, he promoted legislation to fund the expansion and deeper penetration of the Internet in America. He is often credited for popularizing the term 'information super-highway'. Al Gore joined Apple's board of directors in 2003 and became friends with Steve Jobs. He attended most of Steve's keynotes and spoke during the memorial ceremony at Apple after Steve's death.

    Tagged in: Apple 2.0

  • John Couch Born in 1949

    John Couch started his career at Hewlett-Packard before joining Apple in 1978. He was quickly appointed head of the Lisa project, a position that Steve Jobs coveted. Steve's constant interference with the Lisa team made Couch force him out, which led to Steve's taking over the Mac project. Eventually, Couch left Apple in 1984, before Steve hired him back in 2002 to run the company's education efforts.

    Tagged in: Apple 80s

  • Woz Born in 1950

    Steve Wozniak, universally known as Woz, co-founded Apple with Steve Jobs in April 1976. The two became friends despite their age difference, out of their common interest in electronics and Bob Dylan. Woz is the hardware genius behind the Apple I and the Apple II, the world’s first popular personal computers. He stopped working for the company in 1985 but remains one of Steve’s friends, though a distant one. Woz became famous for the US mainstream audience after his appearance on the TV show ' Dancing with the Stars'.

    Tagged in: Apple 80s

  • Jeffrey Katzenberg Born in 1950

    Katzenberg was Michael Eisner's top aide in the 1990s, in charge of animation. He resurrected the studio's past glory with hits such as The Little Mermaid and The Lion King. He was the main protagonist in the original Disney-Pixar deal in 1993-94, and negotiated directly with Steve Jobs. However, he left Disney out of differences with Eisner and started DreamWorks SKG in 1994. Antz was his personal revenge on Eisner, a movie inspired by A Bug's Life but which came out before.

    Tagged in: Pixar

  • Art Levinson Born in 1950

    Arthur D. Levinson was the chairman and CEO of Genentech, a biotech firm, when he joined the Apple board of directors in 2000. An avid Apple user, he got Steve Jobs interested in biotech so much that Jobs proclaimed that, were he young today, he would start a business in that field. He played a critical role in convincing Steve of accepting a modern medical cure for his cancer in 2003, instead of following alternate therapies. He eventually replaced Jobs as chairman of Apple's board in October 2011.

    Tagged in: Apple 2.0

  • John Doerr Born in 1951

    John Doerr is a former Intel salesman who became a venture capitalist in 1980, when he joined Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. He is one of Silicon Valley's most famous VC, who invested in Netscape, Amazon, and Google, among others. Doerr has watched the career of Steve Jobs from the early days. Jobs came to KPCB while he wanted to raise capital for NeXT in 1986, but Doerr turned him down. He eventually became one of Steve's closest friends. Doerr can also be credited for convincing Steve of creating the iPhone App Store, which he backed with $200 million of equity financing for app developers (iFund).

    Tagged in: Apple 80s, Apple 2.0

  • Bob Iger Born in 1951

    Bob Iger was an executive at ABC for a long time, before he was transferred at Disney in 1999, five years after Katzenberg's departure. Iger effectively became Disney's second-in-command, the COO of the company, still run by Michael Eisner at the time. However, after Eisner was forced to leave in 2005, partly because of his mismanagement of the relationship with Pixar, Iger took over. He called Steve Jobs right away, which eventually led to the Pixar-Disney merger in 2006. Iger joined Apple’s board in November 2011, one month after Steve’s death.

    Tagged in: Pixar

  • Bill Atkinson Born in 1951

    Bill Atkinson was one of the most brilliant programmers in the early days of Apple. He joined the company in 1978 and was quickly moved to the Lisa team, where he wrote QuickDraw, a graphic-generation software that was critical in the Lisa's and the Mac's user interfaces. After Lisa shipped, Steve Jobs had him join the Mac team, and he single-handedly wrote the machine's drawing program, MacPaint. He left Apple in 1990. Steve Jobs had an immense admiration for Atkinson and they remained friends years after their careers parted.

    Tagged in: Apple 80s

  • Andy Hertzfeld Born in 1953

    Andy Hertzfeld was one of the first programmers that Jobs recruited on the Mac team. A self-titled 'software wizard', Hertzfeld played a critical role in the designing of the Mac OS and especially the Finder. He left Apple in 1986. However, he is most famous for his website Folklore.org and his book Revolution in the Valley, which explain the making the Macintosh trough a myriad of stories and anecdotes. Hertzfeld remained a friend of Steve Jobs, albeit a distant one, until his death. He now works at Google.

    Tagged in: Apple 80s

  • Dan Kottke Born in 1954

    Dan Kottke was one of Steve's best friends at Reed College. They shared similar views on eastern philosophies, drugs, and weird diets (though Jobs was more radical). They both traveled to India when Steve was 19, in search of 'enlightenment'. Later, Kottke joined Apple and helped out on a number of projects, including Macintosh. However, Steve never spoke to him again after he talked to Michael Moritz of Time Magazine, who wrote a very negative portrait of him.

    Tagged in: Apple 80s

  • Jean-Marie Hullot Born in 1954

    Jean-Marie Hullot is a French developer whom Steve Jobs hired at NeXT in 1986 for his brilliant piece of software which would eventually become Interface Builder (a program to build application interfaces in a very straightforward manner). He became a close collaborator of Bud Tribble and Avie Tevanian when they were building NeXTSTEP. Later, Steve hired him again from 2001, first to work on iCal and iSync, and then on the first version of the iPhone OS. Jean-Marie then left Apple to start Fotopedia (perhaps out of differences with Scott Forstall).

    Tagged in: NeXT, Apple 2.0

  • Bill Fernandez Born in 1955

    Bill Fernandez was one of Steve's only friends in high school. They shared the same interests in pranks and electronics. However, his main role in history was to introduce Steve Jobs to his neighbor, Steve Wozniak, in 1969. Later, Bill joined Apple as one of their first employees.

    Tagged in: Apple 80s

  • Bill Gates Born in 1955

    The Microsoft co-founder's career has intertwined with that of Steve Jobs's several times. After some early work on the Apple II, Microsoft was one of the first companies to write software for the Macintosh in 1982-84. They eventually stole many ideas from the Mac to build the first version of Windows. Fifteen years later, in 1997, Jobs called Gates to make a deal with Apple and settle patent disputes. The two tech titans eventually learned to appreciate one another, even though Gates was always more respectful of Jobs than the opposite.

    Tagged in: Apple 80s, Apple 2.0

  • Jon Rubinstein Born in 1956

    Jon Rubinstein is a hardware engineer who was part of the executive team that Steve brought with him from NeXT when he came back to Apple in 1997. He became VP of Hardware Engineering and his team created all the Macs from 1998 to 2004. He then became VP of the fast-growing iPod division, until his departure from Apple in 2006. Rubinstein joined Palm in 2006, and run its webOS project, inspired by Apple's iPhone project. In 2009, he became Palm's CEO, until the company was bought by HP in 2010.

    Tagged in: Apple 2.0

  • Mona Simpson Born in 1957

    After Steve Jobs's biological parents Abdulfattah Jandali and Joanne Schieble abandoned him in 1955, Abdulfattah's father died, and the couple eventually got married (for a short period of time). They had a baby, Mona, Steve's biological sister. Mona was already an accomplished writer when she met with Steve in 1986 (she wrote the popular book Anywhere But Here). From that day, Steve considered her family, and a close friend. Ten years later, Mona wrote A Regular Guy, a novel that tells the story of Jobs, barely disguised.

    Tagged in: Close ones

  • John Lasseter Born in 1957

    After a brief period at Disney, John Lasseter joined Catmull's and Smith's division at Lucasflim to work on computer animation. He was the creative force behind Pixar's early short movies, including the iconic Luxo Jr. which gave the company its logo. Although animation was nearly killed several times in Pixar's history, Lasseter stayed there, and his talent gave birth to Toy Story, which made the studio a success. He then directed A Bug's Life, Toy Story 2, Cars, and Cars 2. After the Pixar-Disney merger, Lasseter became Disney's Chief Creative Officer.

    Tagged in: Pixar

  • Tina Redse Born in 1959

    Little is known of Christina Redse, Steve Jobs' girlfriend from 1985 to 1989. What is known is that they had a very passionate relationship, and at the same time a very tumultuous one. It peaked when Jobs proposed to her, and she refused, twice. Although Steve happily married with Laurene Powell in 1991, he often brought back the subject of how he missed Tina and wished he could have made their relationship work. (Note: the picture on the left is likely to be one of Tina but this is unconfirmed)

    Tagged in: Close ones

  • Ron Johnson Born in 1959

    A brilliant retail executive, Ron Johnson was hired away from Target by Steve Jobs in 2000, to develop Apple's first retail stores. He is credited for many of the retail stores' pioneer concepts, such as the Genius Bar. He oversaw the tremendous growth of Apple's retail channel from its inception to 2011, when he announced his departure from Apple to become CEO of JC Penney.

    Tagged in: Apple 2.0

  • Tim Cook Born in 1960

    Tim Cook was already an accomplished manager at Compaq when Steve Jobs hired him in 1998 to run Apple's supply chain. Cook quickly gained the reputation of being the "Attila the Hun" of logistics, a mastermind who made Apple the industry leader in inventory management in less than a year. There is no denying Apple could not have sustained its explosive growth or lower its prices without this asset. Cook was promoted COO of the company in 2007, and replaced Steve during his two medical leaves, before eventually replacing him as CEO after his resignation in August 2011.

    Tagged in: Apple 2.0

  • Phil Schiller Born in 1960

    Phil Schiller was one of the NeXT executives who took over Apple with Steve Jobs in 1997. Schiller has been Apple's Senior Vice President of Worldwide Product Marketing ever since, although his job's scope is larger than that — for example, he is credited with the idea of the iPod's click wheel. He is popular among the Apple community for his frequent onstage appearances with Steve Jobs. He delivered Apple's last Macworld keynote in 2009, that Steve cancelled for health reasons, and will likely become Apple's main spokesman in the post-Jobs era.

    Tagged in: Apple 2.0

  • Bono Born in 1960

    The U2 singer is perhaps the most emblematic of Steve's musician friends. Bono played a critical role in having U2 publicly endorse Apple's iTunes Store efforts, and go as far as partnering with the company to make the U2 iPod in 2004. Bono also dealt with Steve on a personal level, since he purchased his Manhattan apartment (on the top floor of the San Remo towers) in 2003. He publicly stood out in defense of Jobs over his supposed aversion to philanthropy, calling Apple 'the largest contributor' to the (RED) campaign with its iPod product line.

    Tagged in: Apple 2.0

  • Avie Tevanian Born in 1961

    Avadis 'Avie' Tevanian is a software genius who is credited for his crucial role in developing Mach, the UNIX core of NeXTSTEP (and, later, Mac OS X and iOS), while he was still a student at Carnegie-Mellon. Steve Jobs hired him early on at NeXT where he became a key architect of the NeXTSTEP operating system. At Apple, from 1997 to 2006, Tevanian oversaw the fast-paced development of Mac OS X, which played a critical part in the company's revival. Avie retired from operational duties in 2006 and is now a director at Elevations Partner.

    Tagged in: NeXT, Apple 2.0

  • Laurene Powell-Jobs Born in 1964

    When Steve Jobs laid eyes on Laurene Powell while giving a lecture at Stanford in 1989, it was love at first sight — or so the story says. The two married less than a year later, in March 1991. Steve and Laurene Jobs were happily married, and gave birth to three children: Reed, Erin and Eve. Before meeting Steve, Laurene got an MBA from the Stanford Business School, and was a trader at Merrill Lynch and Goldman Sachs. She later started Terravera, a natural foods caterer, and College Track, an after-school program to help 'at-risk' high-school students to get into college.

    Tagged in: Close ones

  • Eddy Cue Born in 1964

    Eddy Cue joined Apple in 1988, three years after Steve Jobs left — and nine years before he came back. He was VP of Internet Services for over a decade, overseeing the launch of the Apple online store at apple.com, the iTunes Music Store, the App Store and the iBooks Store. He also took over the MobileMe project after its catastrophic launch in 2008, and the introduction of iCloud in 2011 propelled him to the role of Senior VP of Internet Software and Services.

    Tagged in: Apple 2.0

  • Jony Ive Born in 1967

    London-born Jonathan Ive is the closest to a soulmate that Steve Jobs ever encountered in his professional life. The soft-spoken designer started his career in the UK before moving to California to join Apple in 1992. When Steve Jobs met him in 1997, he quickly grasped how talented he was and promoted him to head of Industrial Design, the small team of designers that conceive Apple's hardware. Obsessed with hardware design as he was, Jobs made sure that the team's decisions could overrule that of any of the company's other divisions. Jobs liked to visit Ive's studio and spoke with him on a daily basis.

    Tagged in: Apple 2.0

  • Tony Fadell Born in 1969

    Tony Fadell was asked to join Apple by Jon Rubinstein in early 2001, while the company was rushing to develop the iPod before that year's holiday season. Fadell had previously done some similar work for PortalPlayer, and accepted on the spot. He was quickly appointed head of the iPod & Special Projects Group, and run that very successful division for seven years. However, he supposedly had a clash with Scott Forstall on the iPhone project, which eventually caused him to leave Apple, become an 'informal adviser' to Steve Jobs in 2008. Fadell then started Nest, a thermostat company, in 2009.

    Tagged in: Apple 2.0

  • Lisa Brennan-Jobs Born in 1978

    Lisa was the unwanted daughter of Steve jobs and his ex-girlfriend from high school, Chrisann Brennan. She was born out-of-wedlock in 1978, and Steve refused to acknowledge he was her father for years. Paradoxically, while he was in denial, he also called Apple's most promising computer project at the time 'LISA'. Eventually, when she was seven, Steve accepted her and she moved in with him in the late 1980s. She eventually graduated from Harvard's School of Journalism. According to Walter Isaacson's bio, Lisa Brennan-Jobs had a tumultuous relationship with her father until the last year of his life.

    Tagged in: NeXT Apple 2.0

  • Reed Jobs Born in 1992

    Reed is Steve Jobs's only son, and his first child with his wife Laurene. Named after Steve's alma mater (something Jobs denied), he always had a special relationship with his father. For example, Steve said to his biographer Walter Isaacson "When I was diagnosed with cancer, I made my deal with God or whatever, which was that I really wanted to see Reed graduate". Isaacson describes him as an intense young man like his father, but who inherited the sweetness of his mother. After his father was diagnosed with cancer, Reed apparently decided to become a cancer researcher. He is a freshman at Stanford as of 2012.

    Tagged in: Close ones

  • Erin Jobs Born in 1995

    The second child of Laurene and Steve, Erin Jobs is described in the Walter Isaacson bio as "quiet, introspective, and [who] seemed not to know exactly how to handle [her father], especially when he was emitting wounding barbs. She was a poised and attractive young woman, with a personal sensitivity more mature than her father’s". She personally talked to Walter Isaacson to say "Sometimes I wish I had more of his attention, but I know the work he’s doing is very important and I think it’s really cool, so I’m fine. I don’t really need more attention."

    Tagged in: Close ones

  • Eve Jobs Born in 1998

    The youngest child of the Jobs family, Eve Jobs is described in the Isaacson bio as a girl 'who turned into a strong-willed, funny firecracker who, neither needy nor intimidated, knew how to handle her father, negotiate with him (and sometimes win), and even make fun of him. Her father joked that she’s the one who will run Apple someday, if she doesn’t become president of the United States'. Another quote from Steve: 'She’s a pistol and has the strongest will of any kid I’ve ever met. It’s like payback.' The girl is apparently very fond of equitation and hopes to become a professional horse rider someday.

    Tagged in: Close ones