Steve, a star for today’s teenagers

Steve v. MarkTechCrunch reports the results of a survey by Junior Achievement about entrepreneurs.

Junior Achievement surveyed 1,000 teens in the United States by telephone to get an idea of which entrepreneurs they admire most. Nearly a quarter of respondents named Jobs as the most admired entrepreneur, albeit down from 35% in the 2009 survey.

Even with Facebook at more than half a billion users, and the movie The Social Network taking the world by storm, Mark Zuckerberg only received 9% of votes for most admired entrepreneur, tying with skateboarding legend Tony Hawk.

Although it’s obvious to almost everybody, I’m still stunned by how mainstream Apple and Steve have become. The same thought came to my mind a couple of days ago. I was sitting at Starbucks in Paris, enjoying my morning latte. Next to me was a group of 5 teenage boys (probably in high school) They were talking about a parody of Steve Jobs that was broadcast on the most famous French satirical TV show (it’s a puppet show) last week. The piece showed Steve selling common objects by just putting an i in front of their name.

One of the boys said: “They’r exaggerating. We don’t buy anything Apple makes. It’s just that they make great stuff…”. He was identifying himself as part of that crowd ready to buy anything Apple.¬†When I was their age, I was the only one in junior high who even knew the name of more than one Apple product. The PC was the norm and Macs were seen as expensive, weird-looking computers that were too slow and had no software. As for Steve Jobs, no one knew who he was – they only knew Bill Gates. I’m talking about 2000-2002 here.

Wow. Things really change fast in this world. I wonder what people will say of Apple and Steve ten years from today.

Steve most powerful man in tech

The magazine T3 is like the Forbes of technology : each year, they make a ranking of “the 100 most influential people in tech”. Guess who ended up #1 this year? That’s right, Uncle Steve. Check it out here.

However, I have to say the rest of the ranking makes me doubtful about its quality. For example, Steve Ballmer is #2 *before* the Google guys. Similarly strange, Foxconn CEO Terry Gou ranks #3, before Intel CEO Paul Otellini and Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. However important Foxconn is in manufacturing gizmos of all sorts for us to enjoy, I doubt the world would be any different if the company were run by another CEO. It’s a different story with Facebook…