Bibliography

Books

    • Return to the Little Kingdom by Michael Moritz
    • Published by Overlook Hardcover in 2009 (Original edition: 1984). ISBN 1590202813
    • The Little Kingdom was written by Time correspondent Michael Moritz while he was investigating Apple and Steve Jobs for a potential Man of the Year story. The book intertwines the story of the development of Lisa and Macintosh, and the early days of the company. It is not focused on Jobs only but is rather an Apple epic.

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    • Steve Jobs, the Journey Is the Reward by Jeffrey S. Young
    • Published by Lynx Books in 1988. ISBN 155802378X
    • The oldest Steve Jobs biography I am aware of, and a well-documented one: The Journey Is The Reward is a very detailed accounted of Steve's life from his birth to the founding of NeXT. Both his personal life and his work are amply covered. A highly recommended vintage buy.

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    • Steve Jobs & the NeXT Big Thing by Randall E. Stross
    • Published by Scribner in 1993. ISBN 0689121350
    • Steve Jobs & the NeXT Big Thing is the only book solely dedicated to Steve's second venture. It is quite a strange mix, as it is well written and documented (Stross is a historian who now writes for the NY Times), but completely misses the point. The goal of the book was indeed to prove Steve's lack of business acumen.

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    • Accidental Empires by Robert X. Cringely
    • Published by HarperBusiness in 1996. ISBN 0887308554
    • Written by Robert X Cringely, Accidental Empires is a book about Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, including a whole chapter on Jobs ("the Prophet"). The book has a distinctive, colored tone to it, even now that it's so dated (hard drives disappearing in the late 90s?). A fun read, although I recommend Cringely's Triumph of the Nerds much more.

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    • A Regular Guy by Mona Simpson
    • Published by Vintage in 1997. ISBN 0679772715
    • A Regular Guy is a novel by Mona Simpson, Steve's biological sister, about the relationship between an entrepreneur and his abandoned daughter... in other words, about Steve and his daughter Lisa. In fact, it seems only the names of the protagonists have been changed. This is a must-read for anyone curious about the private Jobs.

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    • The Second Coming of Steve Jobs by Alan Deutschman
    • Published by Broadway in 2001. ISBN 0767904338
    • Definitely one of my favorite Jobs bios, The Second Coming depicts his wilderness years, from the day he was fired from Apple to the day he became CEO. Written by Vanity Fair journalist Alan Deutschman, the book is filled with gossipy anecdotes and stories, but is nonetheless a very accurate description of Steve's character and life during that period.

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    • Revolution in the Valley by Andy Hertzfeld
    • Published by O'Reilly Media in 2004. ISBN 1449316247
    • Revolution in the Valley is beautiful illustrated book which basically serves as a nice wrapper to the stories told by Andy Hertzfeld and some other Mac team members on Folklore.org. The stories are first-hand accounts of the incredible four-year development of the Mac. If you'd rather read them in a hardcover book, do not hesitate: it's great.

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    • iCon Steve Jobs by Jeffrey S. Young
    • Published by Wiley in 2006. ISBN 0471787841
    • Steve Jobs tried to block the publication of iCon, which gave this disappointing book more publicity than it deserved. It is a stripped-down version of Young's older Jobs bio, The Journey Is The Reward, with some quick additions from newspaper articles and unashamed steals from The Second Coming. I do not think it is worth your time or money.

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    • iWoz by Steve Wozniak
    • Published by Tantor Media in 2007. ISBN 1400103282
    • iWoz is Steve Wozniak's autobiography (written with the help of Gina Smith). The book explains Woz's definitive version of Apple's history, and gives some enlightening accounts on Steve Jobs's character. If you are curious about the company's early days, there is no doubt you have to read this book.

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    • The Perfect Thing by Steven Levy
    • Published by Simon & Schuster in 2007. ISBN 0743285239
    • Steven Levy, former senior editor at Newsweek and Wired's most prominent journalist, is arguably the tech industry's best writer. In The Perfect Thing, he tells the story of the iPod and how it deeply permeated early 21st century culture. The book has many good Steve Jobs stories, but is mostly an outlet for Levy's lyrical enthusiasm about the iPod's coolness.

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    • oPtion$: The Secret Life of Steve Jobs by Fake Steve Jobs
    • Published by Da Capo Press in 2007. ISBN 0306817411
    • Hardly anybody bought this book, which is to me the funniest - and one of the most accurate - depiction of Jobs's character. Fake Steve Jobs (Dan Lyons) wrote the book in the same style as his former hilarious blog and, fair enough, added a plot to it. If you like reading Steve Jobs stories (especially mean ones), rush and buy oPtion$ before it's out of print.

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    • The Pixar Touch by David A. Price
    • Published by Vintage in 2009. ISBN 0307278298
    • The most complete, and even authoritative, book on Pixar so far. Read The Pixar Touch, watch The Pixar Story, and you'll be all set as far as the history of the best digital animation studios (and Steve's "hobby") is concerned.

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    • Inside Steve's Brain by Leander Kahney
    • Published by Portfolio Hardcover in 2009. ISBN 1591842972
    • I read the original version of Inside Steve's Brain, but I doubt the expanded one is very different. From Cult of Mac editor Leander Kahney, the book is essentially an edited collection of quotes, interviews and articles that sum up most of Steve's beliefs, especially in management and product development (like our Persona section, but longer).

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    • The Steve Jobs Way by Jay Elliot
    • Published by Vanguard Press in 2011. ISBN 1593156391
    • Jay Elliot was a middle manager at Apple in the early 1980s. I did not enjoy his book at all, in which he paints himself as "Steve Jobs's confident" and pretends to reveal how his management techniques have made him successful (and can make you, too!). The writing is bad and the "teachings" quite ridiculous. I obviously don't recommend this book.

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    • Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson
    • Published by Simon & Schuster in 2011. ISBN 1451648537
    • Although it has many flaws, not the least of which its almost total unacknowledgement of Steve's NeXT years, Steve Jobs is a must read because of its unique trait: it is the only biography in this list that Steve Jobs approved and took part in. The second half of the book is therefore full of unique insights that he gave to Isaacson on his tenure as Apple's CEO.

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    • Steve Jobs: The Genius Who Changed Our World by the editors of Time Magazine
    • Published by Time Magazine in 2011. ISBN 1618930028
    • Although this Time special book includes a number of very good pictures, it is perhaps not worth the price. The written material is mostly uninteresting to the seasoned Apple fanboy. Perhaps it is the cofee table equivalent of the Isaacson bio.

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    • The Legacy of Steve Jobs by the editors of Fortune Magazine
    • Published by Fortune Magazine in 2011. ISBN 1618930028
    • The Fortune counterpart of the Time special above compares much more favorably, in my opinion. It provides less interesting pictures, yes, but has much richer content, including all the interviews Steve ever gave to the business publication (which he liked). Also available as an iPad app (the version I purchased).

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    • Inside Apple by Adam Lashinsky
    • Published by Business Plus in 2012. ISBN 145551215X
    • Adam Lashinsky wrote Inside Apple after the wild success of his Fortune article How Apple Works. Although most informed Apple followers will not learn much form it, I still recommend it warmly for those are intererested in business and how Steve Jobs managed his company. Basically, if you enjoyed reading Steve at work, go for it.

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Movies & Documentaries

    • Triumph of the Nerds by Robert X. Cringely
    • Produced by PBS in 1996. ASIN B00006FXQO
    • Triumph of the Nerds is in my opinion the best documentary ever made about the history of the personal computing industry. Cringely is a very entertaining narrator, and he managed to interview almost all of the leading characters of the PC business in this three-part series, including extensive interviews with Jobs and Gates. A must watch.

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    • Pirates of Silicon Valley
    • Published by Leanne Moore in 1999. ASIN B0009NSCS0
    • Pirates is a 1999 TV movie about the early years of Apple and Microsoft, with Noah Wyle playing Steve. The movie is very dramatized of course, but overall it is quite realistic - so much so that Steve actually invited Noah to start his keynote speech at Macworld New York 1999, giving the movie some sort of official blessing. Worth a watch.

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    • The Pixar Story by Leslie Iwerks
    • Published by Leslie Iwerks Productions in 2007. ASIN B006RZZOCQ
    • If you are interested in Pixar and Steve Jobs's involvement with the animation studios, you should definitely watch this 90 minute documentary which has a lot of exclusive material, such as extensive interviews with all the founders, Steve included. However the cost of that is that co-founder Alvy Ray Smith is barely mentioned.

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